Japanese Researchers Warn That Peace Sign Can Lead To Identity Theft

Identity Theft From This?

Identity Theft From This?

Could such an innocuously innocent act as giving this universal "peace" sign be putting people at risk of identity theft? It seems so absurd, but as researchers at the Japan’s National Institute of Informatics (NII) have recently pointed out, the internet isn't always such an innocent place.

Fignerprint Tech Is Becoming More Wide Spread

Fignerprint Tech Is Becoming More Wide Spread

The peace sign, while used around the globe, is mostly favored by Asian girls and Donald Trump.

The NII say that fingerprint technology is becoming more widely available, used now to log on to tablets and smartphones. So you can see where this is going, right?



Casually Making A Peace Sign

Casually Making A Peace Sign

“Just by casually making a peace sign in front of a camera, fingerprints can become widely available,” said NII researcher Isao Echizen in an interview with Japanese newspaper, Sankei Shimbun.

“Fingerprint data can be recreated if fingerprints are in focus with strong lighting in a picture,” the same researcher told Yomiuri TV.

Probably Easier Than You Think

Probably Easier Than You Think

It was also pointed out that a potential identity thief doesn't necessarily need advanced technology, and that pretty much anyone could potentially copy fingerprints if they had the inclination to do so. No, we're not trying to you ideas....



Protection?

Protection?

According to The Japan Times, the NII has developed a transparent film which contains titanium oxide and may be attached to the fingers in order to hide prints, but will not prevent them being used for identity verification.

However, this tech would not be ready for another two years.