5 Ways To Make Sure People Listen When You Talk

Consider The Audience

Consider The Audience

If you're speaking at some sort of formal event, you had better leave the casual jokes at home. Likewise, if you're speaking to people who aren't expecting you to be a world leader, then it's best not to approach the situation like you're about to address the United Nations.

Think about the point you're trying to get across and the concerns of the people you're trying to convey the message to. But be yourself. You don't want it to sound contrived. Just be considerate.

Use Your Voice

Use Your Voice

That's a given, right?

What we really mean here is that you should use you voice to its potential. Use it so you sound convincing and like you believe in what you're saying. Don't try and get it all out straight away. Yeah, you probably have a list of points, either in your head or on paper, which you are going to try and get through. But when we're conscious of this, we often rattle them off too quickly without delivering them as effectively as we might if we took our time.

Slow down, allow yourself to breathe, and control the pace and pitch of your speech. This is a race not won quickly.



Be Confident

Be Confident

Whether you're telling the truth or not, the fact is that if you come across all shy and timid, your audience won't believe you like they would if you were more confident. This is a very simple concept but one that often needs a bit of consideration ...simply because sometimes, people get nervous.

Be confident. Or simply fake confidence until you have it.

Stand Tall

Stand Tall

Or, you know, sit tall....

This carries on from the confidence thing. In large part, your audience will unconsciously learn how they'll respond to your words by your body language. So again, standing tall or sitting up straight will give them the sense that your words should be taken as authoritative.



Make Eye Contact

Make Eye Contact

If you're addressing a whole bunch of people, it might be a harder job than if you're talking one-on-one, simply because there are so many eyes to make contact with. In this situation, all you need to do is keep that chin up and don't stare in the one spot the whole time. Casually scan around the audience from time to time, as you speak. This will make you appear relaxed and in control, giving the audience the sense you know what you're talking about.

On the other hand, if you're addressing a smaller group, or perhaps even only one person, make direct eye contact, but not so much that it might be taken as intimidating. There's a fine line but really, all you need to concern yourself with is your instinct as to whether your audience trusts you. If they do, then they are definitely listening.