This Strange Spherical Cloud Was Just Spotted Hovering Over Japan

Aliens!

Aliens!

It has to be aliens, right? I mean, what other explanation could there possibly be for a perfectly spherical cloud to be hovering over Japan?!

It might be worthwhile asking yourself this question, just for the sake of considering all angles; Why would aliens travel in clouds?

A World Of Cloud

A World Of Cloud

Clouds come in all sorts of shapes and sizes (and then there's that time where someone saw Jesus in a piece of toast and sold it for a lot of cash on eBay) and this one happened to be spherical.

It appeared in the sky over the Fujisawa, in the Kanagawa Prefecture of Japan.

Regret Not Taking It Earlier

Regret Not Taking It Earlier

“When I looked out of the car window I saw a round ball-shaped cloud. I gazed at the cloud for a while then I rushed to take the photo. When I saw the cloud it was an even more spherical shape, so I regret not taking the photo more quickly,” wrote Twitter user, @pmxpvrtmx.

Blowing Away On A Breeze

Blowing Away On A Breeze

We all have regrets, dude. I'd say that if you reach the day of reckoning and the only thing you look back on wishing you had done better is take a picture of a cloud slightly earlier than you did, then you've probably led a decent (if not uneventful) life.

But Why?

But Why?

This is not a totally uncommon occurrence. To climatologists, this is known as a "roll cloud" (one of the two types of arcus cloud) and is usually formed by outflows of cold air from sea breezes or cold fronts in the absence of storm clouds, or under wind created from air streams going over mountains on a windy day.

However, it would be far more common for roll clouds to appear to be horizontally tube-shaped, not spherical as seen in Fujisawa.