Study Shows Black People Wait Longer For Uber And Lyft Rides

Black Name

Black Name

Did you know that some people choose a less black-sounding name when they call for an Uber or Lyft? It might sound pretty crazy but it's true, and as it turns out, there's a legit reason.

Discrimination

Discrimination

The theory is that Uber and Lyft drivers will often discriminate against people who happen to have a more black-sounding name. Or, in the case of Lyft where they have a picture, will straight-up choose based on the image of their face.



It's A Real Thing

It's A Real Thing

It seems as though that idea is more than just a theory. A new study has proven that it is indeed one hundred percent accurate. Uber and Lyft drivers are discriminating against black people when deciding whether or not to take a job.

What's In A Name?

What's In A Name?

According to CNN Money, a study published earlier this week by professors at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University and the University of Washington, showed that drivers were less likely to pick up someone with an "African American-sounding" name as opposed to someone with a "white-sounding" name.



Gender and Race

Gender and Race

The study was initially designed to examine the potential for any race or gender discrimination when it comes to ride sharing outfits like Uber and Lyft. The results were taken from a total of 1,500 rides in both Boston and Seattle.

Eliminating Variables

Eliminating Variables

So as to control the study and make it as fair as possible, those conducting the research had the assistants taking part use the same type of phones, with the same phone carrier, and even the very same data plan. This way, they could eliminate any potential variables.



Names and Faces

Names and Faces

In the case of Lyft, of course, the driver can see both the person's name and an image of their face, whereas with Uber, the driver has only the passenger's name upon accepting, and will not learn of the destination until they've picked them up.

Hoping For Nothing

Hoping For Nothing

The researchers completing the study said that they didn't really want to find the results that they found, hoping that the study would prove that there was no discrimination based on either race or gender.



Strong Evidence

Strong Evidence

"We went into this hoping that we wouldn't see anything, but we found pretty strong evidence of discrimination," study co-author Christopher Knittel, a professor at MIT Sloan School of Management, said in an interview with CNN Money.

30 Percent

30 Percent

The research found that, in the case of UberX, black people were forced to wait an average of 30 percent longer than white people.

"I have no reason to think Lyft drivers are different form Uber drivers," Knittel added.



Kept In The Car

Kept In The Car

The study also managed to pick up on gender issues. Although not as damning as the difference between race, it did show that women were kept in the car about 5% longer than men were over the same routes.

Why would that be?

Country-Wide?

Country-Wide?

"The additional travel that female riders are exposed to appears to be a combination of profiteering and flirting to a captive audience," the study read.

Sure, the study was conducted over just two cities, but do you think that the irrefutable suggestion that people are treated differently based on race, and also gender, is something that occurs in the whole of the United States?